Is Medical School for you?

Date2015-02-05

Is Medical School for you?

Several year ago a patient asked a physician about the advisability of a career in medicine. The answer was a cliché' response to the effect "Only go into medicine if you can't picture yourself doing anything else." Well, even if that mantra is a hackneyed status of the phrase, there's much truth in it. Without a overpowering passion for the medical field, you'll have a tough time making it through all the bumps and hurdles ahead of you. The fact is that medical school is a long, tedious, and grueling process no matter how you slice the pie. In many cases, your trip down the medical highway will require years of intensive training, and hundreds of thousands of those green pieces of paper with the picture of dead presidents on the front. And after your training is completed, you'll still have to work hard, and depending on your medical specialty, it's possible with the high-level of stress involved, you may have to re-introduce yourself to your bed on occasion. Another step in the process as to whether you should pursue a medical career is knowing your personality and having an unadulterated passion for medicine itself, not the money you'll make, nor the social status, and have a high tolerance for stress. You'll also be working over 60 hours a week, have dealings on a daily basis with non-compliant patients, and for sure, be underappreciated. Another arrow in your decision to enter the medical profession is knowing you won't have much of a social life, you'll pay through the nose for medical malpractice insurance, be constantly on call, and be able to be reasonably friendly when you're on call at the hospital at 3:00 am to deal with a patient. Getting into medical school is a simple process and you should apply if your want to become a doctor. Medical schools offer varying advanced degrees in medicine. Typically, doctors attend medical school for four years after a bachelor's degree and then go on to complete an internship and residency before they can practice. That said, the best way to get a jump on medical school is to start preparations early. Do well in high school so you can get entrance into the best possible undergraduate program which, in turn, will increase your opportunities for medical school. The next step would be to study for the MCAT long before you actually take the exam, and get your application done for early entrance consideration. Medical school will be a burdensome endeavor on your time, finances and education. You should also be prepared to know and attend science lectures and lab courses like chemistry, biochemistry, anatomy, and genetics. So ultimately is this medical path for you? Well, if you have the drive, the time and money, plus a commitment for a life wearing a "white coat", the payoff can be extraordinary and quite rewarding. Note: It has been found that many medical school applicants are children of active physicians which can be helpful.